Category Archives: Apple

The tablet wars are not a foregone conclusion

Marco Arment spent a hell of a lot of time trying to make the simple point that the tablet wars are a foregone conclusion in favor of Apple.  The thing that stuck out about his review of a review is that it spends so much time frothing at the mouth because someone said something nice about a competing Apple product that’s true. But if Ars says the hardware of the Tab 10.1 is nicer than the iPad and it’s a true statement, what’s the problem?  The Ars review pointed out that the third party hardware support on iPad is still beating Android.

When you get to the bottom line, Mr. Arment’s conclusion like so many pundits is that the tablet wars are over and Apple owns the market due to its dominance in app support.  If these pundits are right, then every other hardware maker in the industry will just have to hang themselves, fire everyone, and close up shop.  Or the more realistic outcome is that everyone else will tighten their margins and start competing on price.  When nicely configured Android tablets are selling for $300 or less on a more mature Android 3.x OS and a maturing app market, they will be competitive on price and value.

Beyond Apple and Google, Microsoft Windows 8 tablets will start showing up with something that looks like a very usable touch interface in the fall of 2012 (3 years after Windows 7).  The third party app market will be thin but it will run existing Windows software and drivers so that you can do things like print without sticking your iPad or Android device in a copier.  Microsoft will likely make MS Office (including Outlook email) usable on a tablet interface and it will be enterprise manageable in terms of maintenance and security.

The Windows 8 tablets whether they’re on ARM or Intel x86 SoCs (without legacy PCI support) will be competitive on a hardware level for the first time.  The main thing that really bothers me is the fact that Windows 8 won’t show up for more than another year and things can change in that period of time, but it doesn’t mean that the market will only support one or two players.  Microsoft is probably very late to the party, but the game is not over by a long shot especially when the value aspect of Windows tablets come into play.  While the PC makers will be reluctant to participate in a “race to the bottom” in profit margins, that is the harsh reality that they operate in.  Windows 8 tablets will essentially be netbooks with capacitive touch screens which means they shouldn’t really cost more than $100 over the price of existing netbooks.  That puts Windows 8 tablets in the $350 to $500 price range which is very compelling to the stingy PC shoppers who aren’t going to buy Apple.

Apple’s 3.5″ tablet costs $749

Apparently, Apple’s 3.5 inch tablet with 3G and phone capability (what Apple calls their “iPhone”) with 16 or 32 MB storage costs $649 or $749.  These devices are nice, but it’s against my principles to pay that kind of profit margin for a device like this.

If I was in the market for a phone and data service contract that subsidized it, I’d wait for the next model.  This timing just doesn’t seem right.

MacBook Air 2011 Model Launch Immenent

Normally I wouldn’t go out of my way to put forth a baseless prediction, but while browsing the prices I did notice that the refurbished models of the MacBook Air have all dropped by about $20, previously the entry level MacBook Air model was listed at $849 with a 15% discount. I have watched the refurbished store in the past and noticed that shortly before a product launch, the prices for a particular product would drop as a successor was released shortly there after. This would lead me to believe that Apple will probably launch a new MacBook Air right around the time of the WWDC. My only other explanation for Apple to reduce the prices of their refurbished MacBook Airs would be that the products simply aren’t moving from the refurbished market which would be something I have yet to witness from Apple.

The only reason why I am even bringing this up on this site is that after a quick Google search, I haven’t seen anyone else make this observation and thought I would try and be the first to call this prediction.  A number of other sites have predicted the next MacBook Air would be released around June/July with a SandyBridge Processor and Thunderbolt interface.  Most likely this will include an integrated  Intel HD3000 graphics chipset which will likely result in a significant boost in CPU performance all the while being inferior in 3D graphics.  Then again, who buys a MacBook Air for gaming or graphics editing?

UPDATE: Well, apparently I was incorrect in assuming the exact release date.   Hopefully Apple will refresh the model sooner than later.

MacBook Pro 2011, The Good and the Bad

Like many others, I had been holding my breath for the greatness of the Macbook Pro hoping some of the rumors where true while others were not.
First let’s take a look at the good which would be the obvious inclusion of the Sandy Bridge processor. The Core 2 Duo was aging gracefully, but still needed to be retired only to be replaced by a much speedier i5 offering two generations of performance boost over the Core 2 Duo. The immediate added bonus and probably the second most promoted item would be the inclusion of Light Peak, or as we have now rebranded it, Thunderbolt. With an interface that allows for 10GB of bandwidth across the interface, moving data to an SSD has never been so fast. In fact, I might want to run my games off of the external drive because of the speed. Also a couple of maintstays with the New Macbook Pro are the Firewire 800 port and two USB ports. We have the same Super drive without any mentioning of the BluRay drive at this time. Clearly Apple wants to distance itself from Sony and promote their iTunes store here. All MacBook Pros include an illuminated keyboard which they have for a couple of generations now. The resolution starts with the very familiar 1280×800 and moves upwards. We also include the familiar SD card slot which started with the 2010 generation of MacBook Pros  The one last good thing that I have to mention is that they have bumped up the hard drive capacity to 320 GB by default.  However, if you want to get an SSD, they are by no means any cheaper of an upgrade than they were a year ago.

Now time for what I consider the bad. The Macbook Air 13.3″ laptop has a superior 1440×900 resolution screen that makes me almost want that particluar laptop instead of the 13.3″ MacBook Pro. Also, and I personally hold Intel responsible for this, but the 13.3″ models also suffer from using Intel’s intregrated HD 3000 video card. This is an unfortunate departure from the nVidia chipsets in the last four generations of Macbook Pros. At this time, I have not met an Intel video chipset which I have liked. They are all slow performers and lack the power that I need just for my day to day operations. I may try the latest Macbook and change my mind, but I highly doubt this. I can usually tell when I am running a PC with an Intel graphics chip or an alternative.
Last and this is what I probably consider why I recommend anyone with a current Macbook Pro to stay away from this upgrad is that Apple has slashed the battery life with the new upgrade. They are now 3 hours less than the previous generation. That to me means that I might as well stick with my iPad for the long trips or try getting a different brand of laptop. -See Update.  I currently think a Lenovo Thinkpad T420 has my name on it. As much as I was looking forward to the new releases, Apple has done little to impress me and much to disappoint me.

As for Steve Jobs, please get well soon as I feel your company is beginning to disappoint me.

UPDATE: There was a bit of a misunderstanding on the battery life. Apparently the battery holds the same charge as before and the laptop has the same power draw as before, but the tests were changed.  As noted in a computer shopper review.  The battery life is the same in both 13.3″ laptops.  The new testing is that using the DVD drive during the operation of the laptop while the older test was based on “average” use.  Average use would be something akin to browsing the web or performing other low CPU intensive tasks.   I hope that holds accurate as I would hate to see newer generations of laptops moving towards power draining CPUs again.

Novell’s Patents and Why CDTN Holdings Wants Them.

The web was a buzz earlier today with news that Microsoft wasn’t the only company being involved in CDTN Holdings and some including ZDNet and ComputerWorld blogger Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols tried to speculate just what patents each of the member companies of CDTN Holdings would want and why.
First many thought that VMware would jump at the opportunity to get an OS to complete their stack and as I found out talking to a few PR employees from VMware, they pretty much already have everything they need from Novell, or so they say. Of course, VMware is owned by EMC who is a partner in CDTN holdings, so the VMware reps didn’t exactly inform me accurately.  After a quick search I did happen to find patent number7,793,101, which is Verifiable virtualized storage port assignments for virtual machines . I think I could see why VMware might want a crack at that patent portfolio now. I noticed that there are several more storage based and virtualization based patents for VMware and their parent company EMC to hand pick through. Keep in mind that Microsoft is also competing in the virtualization space as well.
In the storage space there are a few other gems including:

  • 7,844,787 Techniques for data replication with snapshot capabilities
  • 7,844,580 Methods and systems for file replication utilizing differences between versions of files
  • 7,809,910 Backup archive management
  • 7,774,568 Clustered snapshots in networks

VMware is also dabbling in identity management, also something that Microsoft has been working with for some time. Oracle and Apple also have identity management needs and would probably not hesitate to pick up a couple patents for their own related products.
With Identity Management we have a whole slew of goodies to pick through including:

  • 7,770,204 Techniques for securing electronic identities
  • 7,774,826 System and method for determining effective policy profiles in a client-server architecture
  • 7,793,340 Cryptographic binding of authentication schemes
  • 7,793,342 Single sign-on with basic authentication for a transparent proxy
  • 7,774,827 Techniques for providing role-based security with instance-level granularity

All four companies might be interested in improving their application deployment technologies with the following patents:

  • 7,730,480 System and method for creating a pattern installation by cloning software installed another computer
  • 7,739,681 Delayed application installation
  • 7,730,179 System and method for policy-based registration of client devices

The point I am trying to make is that each of these four companies have much to gain for the capital they put together to get access to these patents.
Many of us know that Microsoft is all about their Operating System, their Active Directory architecture, Search, their entry into Cloud computing.
EMC is the storage giant, but they also own VMware, RSA, Atmos, vBlock, Mozy, RecoverPoint, Documentum and have just as much if not more to gain than Microsoft.
Oracle while everyone knows is a database company, has bought more companies than anyone else, and leverage patents from Identity Management to Virtualization. Don’t forget that they own Sun Microsystems and happen to have Virtual Box.
Lastly we have Apple, who seems to stand out as while being worth more than anyone in this venture, appears to have the least to gain. However, when considering identity management, Apple would be quick to take advantage. Novell has quite a few data synchronization patents that could help out their MobileMe services. Single SignOn could be a big plus for them as well. They don’t really seem to have as much to gain from what I can tell, but then again, Apple doesn’t think like most companies. We could see them try dive into the enterprise with some of these patents or perhaps they could push themselves to the cloud.
All in all, we have four companies that are going to benefit greatly from the jewels of Novell, their patents. And while everyone was too busy worrying about the UNIX copyrights, the patents which I consider much more important were being handed over pretty much going unnoticed by the media.
Trying to figure out the direction that Attachmate will take Novell is very scary, especially handing out all of the patents like they did. As a Novell customer myself, I am concerned. Then again, who really knows the direction of the tech industry in the long term.

The Aftermath of this transaction is most interesting. Novell was a real hot potato that no one company wanted entirely. The market share of Novell has been slipping since the 90’s, and their recognition is even less. When talking to a salesman for a backup software company, he failed to even recognize the name and recommended that I speak to a tech. Yet, much to the dismay of many, when the patents for Novell were up for grabs, these four companies were first in line.  Microsoft, Apple, EMC, and Oracle are bitter enemies on several fronts, and yet they put aside their differences to pick apart this former powerhouse.

4th generation iPod touch pressures the android device market

Speaking as someone who would never install iTunes on his computer (which rules out Apple products for me), I can’t help but notice that the new iPod touch just made all the android mini tablets like the Ramos W7 or even the Dell Streak obsolete. There’s no 3G capability, but you can get a MiFi device that’s far more useful. The smoother UI in conjunction with the superior display is the killer feature of this phone, not to mention the iOS app store.
http://www.apple.com/ipod/

There might still be a market for 5″ and 7″ devices, but word has it that Apple is going to fill the gap between 3.5″ and 9.8″ soon.

I guess the good news is that the generic clone market is going to have to lower their prices if they want to be competitive.  The Ramos W7 android device costs $50 less than the entry iPod touch and it has an SDHC and HDMI slot as well as a larger 4.8″ LTPS screen which makes it a plausible alternative.  The big margin for Apple is the 32 GB and 64 GB models which you almost have to buy since there is no SDHC slot on the iPod and external readers like this are just plain ugly.  Still, Apple is putting the major squeeze on its competitors.

Image credit: Apple

Some noteworthy posts – June 9 2010

Apple faking 489 to 815 PPI on iPhone 4 ads

After examining the iPhone 4 advertisements, it appears that Apple is showing 3 to 5 times the Pixels Per Inch (PPI) in their ads when they should only be showing 2 times the PPI.

Estimate of network bandwidth for iPhone 4 FaceTime
From my estimates, FaceTime video conferencing on iPhone 4 will take 667 Kbps to 2 Mbps. If my assumptions about the resolution and frame rate of FaceTime is correct, it explains why FaceTime is limited to Wi-Fi operation.

If Apple allows interoperability, the industry must follow
Matt Hamblen of Computer World wrote about Steve Jobs’ lofty goals for the iPhone 4’s video conferencing feature “FaceTime” to become an open standard.  Open standards are always welcome, but the industry generally looks at these invitations with suspicion and for good reason.  Just because a standard is “open” doesn’t mean it is royalty free.

iPhone idle disconnects also to blame for network problems
Steve Cheney of business insider has a very interesting article on how Apple’s hardware design choices for the Apple iPhone are also to blame for AT&T’s wireless congestion problems. More importantly, iPhone OS 4 will make this even worse with the addition of multitasking.

DDR2 memory prices doubled over last year
Silicon chips are one of those things that we simply assume will continually drop in price as time goes on, but that is more of a general trend which isn’t immune to temporary upward trends. Over the last year, I thought it was my imagination that computer memory prices were rising. Unfortunately for technology lovers, it wasn’t my imagination.

Do you really need 300 PPI on a 3.5 inch phone?
Apple claims that 300 Pixels Per Inch (PPI) is the limit of the human eyes when viewing something approximately 11 inches away from the eyes, and that the iPhone’s 326 PPI beats competing Smartphones with only 252 PPI. 252 PPI is the eye’s limit at 13 inches, but do people really hold their phone less than 13 inches away?

Can your tablet digitizer pass the bumble bee test?

This video clip of world-famous pianist Lang Lang playing Flight of the bumble bee” has become the next viral video crazy.

Not only is it funny, it shows just how good the iPad’s multi-touch digitizer and OS is if it can register the fingers of Lang Lang.  Lot’s of companies make touch screen devices and even multi-touch tablets, but can they pass the bumble bee test?  If I were still reviewing hardware, I’d make this one of my test requirements for any tablet OS.  Do people need to play the piano on their tablet?  Probably never, but they do like their touch screen devices to respond instantly and accurately to the touch.

YouTube HTML5 slightly better, but still bad

Earlier last month, I found that YouTube’s HTML5 beta wasn’t even worthy of being beta.  Three weeks after that, Jan Ozer ran some CPU performance tests between YouTube Flash and HTML5 on Mac OS X and Safari and found that CPU performance was better on HTML5.  However, my tests (using same 720P video posted by Jan) on Windows with Google Chrome showed that both are equally bad CPU hogs, but HTML5 was also very buggy and still had very bad image quality.

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